Home arrow Calendar
The Old Cahawba Web Page is a
Project of the
Cahawba Advisory Committee
Calendar
Previous month Previous day Next day Next month
See by year See by month See by week See Today Search Jump to month
PARK DAY Print
Saturday, April 02 2011, 09:00 - 05:00 by  This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Hits : 694

April 2, 9:00 a.m.

Not only the first state capital, but also an important Civil War site! Come learn Cahawba's significance while helping us reverse the wear and tear on the site during this clean up day. Free T-shirts for the first 25 attendees. Contact Old Cahawba at 334-872-8058. *

 

More details on Park Day Web site: http://www.civilwar.org/aboutus/events/park-day/ 

David Rothstein author of Casualties, a Novel of the Civil War , will be on hand to sign books and do a reading.





Author of
Casualties to speak at Old Cahawba Park Day

 

 

In the American Civil War everyone was a casualty.” So says Jacksonville, Oregon author, David Rothstein in his just-published novel, Casualties.

 

The novel, inspired by a true occurrence, is the story of Laura Connor who in the spring of 1864 sets out alone from her home in Indiana driving a wagon and team of horses. She has determined to rescue her husband, Thomas, a captured Union soldier, from the Confederate prison at Cahawba in Alabama.

 

With each step of her journey Laura descends further into the heart of the war’s darkness: scourged landscapes, a Confederate surgeon faced with the aftermath of a battle, bereaved mothers of wounded and killed soldiers, runaway slaves, and somewhere in the swamps in a dying and abandoned country, the prison. She has no idea how she will be received there or even if Thomas is still alive.

 

Laura’s journey and Thomas’ ordeal at the prison are a metaphor for the war itself,” says Rothstein. “They are ordinary people from an ordinary place, the kind of people who bear the brunt of the suffering in any war. And their fight to prevail over it is heroic.”

 

The story is a labor of love, the product of over seven years’ research and writing. “I began with an interest in the war itself, an interest that led quickly to the enormous stock of contemporaneous writing done by the private soldiers and their families.

 

This year we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. One of the best ways of doing that is by understanding and appreciating how ordinary people on both sides suffered and bled.”

 

More Americans were killed in the Civil War than in all of our other wars combined—a total of 620,000 military deaths. “But,” says Rothstein, “the numbers only describe the dimensions of the story. The real story, the story that speaks most directly to us, is found in the letters, diaries, journals and memoirs of ordinary soldiers and those at home who prayed for them.

 

That’s what this novel is about. The characters in this novel are the face of the American Civil War. They could be any of our ancestors.”

 

The novel has gotten excellent reviews. New York Times best selling author LEE SMITH says,

 

I was completely gripped by Casualties, as vivid and accurate a novel of the Civil War as has ever been written. It is similar to Cold Mountain in that it involves a journey, and it also possesses the unusual feature of being both a man's book and a woman's book at once.”

 

I think it's a brilliant novel, tightly and carefully constructed though it covers literally the breadth and length of the War. I especially admire the eloquent yet unsentimental prose style, which perfectly captures the gravity and intensity of this extraordinary time.”

 

Rothstein is a retired professor and business executive, most recently a Vice President at Rocky Mountain Institute in Boulder, Colorado. In 1976 he received his PhD in Anthropology and Philosophy from the University of Oregon and was on the faculty at The University of Alabama from 1976 through 1979. He has been invited to present readings and a discussion at an annual event in April at the site of the prison in Cahawba, Alabama.

 

The novel is available on Amazon.com and at most bookstores, including the Visitor Center at Old Cahawba and Goat Hill Museum Store in the Alabama State Capitol. There are also eBook editions on Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Sony Reader.

 

Contact:

David Rothstein

(541) 941-9427

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

Location: Old Cahawba Park
Contact: 334-872-8058

Back

JEvents v1.4.2   Copyright © 2006-2007